Archive for the ‘Flowers’ Category

Bring Spring In

May 18, 2011

SANDPOINT, Idaho: It was chilly in town this morning. And windy. And sort of raining. These tulips cheered me up when I got home from work. I cut them from the yard yesterday, also chilly, windy and spitting. The sun came out a little this afternoon and it was pouring through the window in such a way that I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to capture it and share it on the world wide web. Glorious.

I think I said this last year too, (in a much different place) but no matter where you are – metropolis or country side, dreary weathered, sunny, cloudy, chipper, busy as a beaver, or bored to death – get yourself some tulips tonight (at the very latest tomorrow.) If you are lucky enough to cut them yourself or buying at the corner bodega, here is a tip in case you didn’t know already: pick the blooms that haven’t opened yet. As an example, these guys were closed pretty tight yesterday when they were still attached to the ground. They will open quickly, especially in a sunny window, and last much longer.

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Wedding Flowers

April 26, 2010

TUCSON, Arizona: The narrative of my mini vacation to the southwest continues with a photo recap of the gorgeous arrangements, created by Sprout. Yes, they travel.

The cedar walk in closet made an excellent holding pen for the table arrangements.


Images of the luxurious grounds at the Arizona Inn to follow shortly. The gardens were truly amazing and inspiring, so stay tuned.

Finding Paradise (on the outskirts of Bushwick)

October 16, 2009

HUMBOLDT ST, Brooklyn: It’s good to have a garden. When you hunker down close to the earth you can almost feel like you’re somewhere else. Radishes gone to flower…

IMG_1219…taken the end of August.

IMG_1224Somewhere else indeed…

Veggies Don’t Wait for Blogs

September 10, 2009

HUMBOLDT ST, Brooklyn: We interrupt the regularly scheduled coverage of my adventures in Goshen to bring you an update of the Brooklyn homestead. Considering vegetables don’t sleep (do they?) that means things keep growing and yet again I can hardly keep up. We have been consistently harvesting a generous handful of beans every week. Also the first two heirloom tomatoes that I started from some Baker Creek Seeds way back the beginning of the season finally got red enough to pluck. With more tomatoes on the way i am so stoked right now to be growing food. The zinnias aren’t too hard on the eyes either.

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IMG_0985IMG_1035IMG_1297
IMG_0962In the next few weeks stay tuned for posts on pickling and the always stellar Roberta’s. If I only had a little more time in the day!

SAVE THOSE SEEDS.

July 4, 2009

HOME, Brooklyn: Pictured here you will see sunflower babies from seeds that were harvested off the beasts I grew last year along our fence. Worthy of another post altogether, I was surprised by the speed and size of my sunflowers last year and saved a bunch of seeds when they had dried out and were falling out in the fall.

I figured I would just plant as many seeds as I possibly could because I wasn’t sure they would even grow since the parent plants were from a crappy $.50 seed packet bought at Home Depot promising freakishy large (aka genetically altered) blooms. I’m not really too informed on the seed industry, but supposedly many brands of seeds sold in the US these days do not produce “fertile” plants. Needless to say I need more pots! We shall see if they flower, of course, I will keep you posted. 

NIGHT SHOT, WEEK TWO:

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WEEK 4ish:

DSCN3991I just like having all the green even if they never flower. In this city, in this neighborhood, the more green the better.

The South Will Rise Again

June 24, 2009

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DECATUR, Georgia: An old pal of mine, who is currently living outside Atlanta Georgia, sent along these pics of his gorgeous green beans. I would love to see what everyone else has growing! Email me! igrewthis@gmail.com.
Obviously, the south is a little ahead of us up here in Brooklyn. We will be expecting our first bean harvest next month. 

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Also, my buddy felt the need to show up my pathetic planter grown hydrangea (see first post ever “HYDRA, YO”) check out his:

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4763_127023911616_532126616_2837708_973161_nIf I only had a front yard…

HYDRA, YO

June 13, 2009

first bloom 1

HOME, Brooklyn, NY: My hydrangea is blooming. It was a gift from my Aunt in 2006, one of those small plastic container plants you can buy in the grocery store when the season is right. They are usually bloomed out to the max,  so super hyped on miracle grow the roots are practically bursting their bucket. Mostly, I think, people buy these and throw them away when they are done flowering. As soon as this gal was done with her pretty business that first year I transplanted her into a bigger pot. I did not have any outdoor space at this point and she slowly lost every leaf looking like a skeleton of sticks, but i held on to my hopes!

The next year I moved into a place with a bit of exterior square footage. Hydra had some how managed to sprout a single pathetic leaf, off a new sprout growing from the middle of what used to be her lushness. I sympathized how confusing it must be for a seasonal plant to have to be exclusively indoors for a year and a half. I wasn’t surprised that she wasn’t looking that great. I was surprised she was still alive. When spring rolled around I was wondering if the outdoors would be too overwhelming. I took it easy on her at first, outside just in the shade for a couple hours, until we had worked her up to full time. And she was happy, new leaves were appearing and then she was back, bigger than when I first got her. But no flowers. She was just a leafy bush that summer, not even an attempt to flower. I had been curious what color they would be, since I read about how the acidity of the soil is what determines the shade of the bloom (more alkaline will render pink, while a lower pH will render blue – however white supposedly is always white.) Well, I am not that in tune with chemistry of my soil, maybe someday when I am old and turn into some kind of crazy extreme gardener, I will give a shit. For now it seemed more exciting to leave it up to chance. She was blue when we first met and, to cut to the chase, after two years of only leaves, I am delighted to showcase her first gorgeous lavender pouf. Purple is so in right now.

first bloom 2 Also happy to report there are many more in the making, as you can see! The romantic in me thinks this view looks like a big giant heart. This is going to be a good year.